Wednesday, 18 November 2015

All Blacks legend Jonah Lomu dies aged 40

New Zealand is mourning one of its greatest sporting heroes after the former All Blacks player Jonah Lomu died unexpectedly in Auckland on Wednesday at the age of 40.


John Mayhew, the former All Blacks doctor, confirmed the news on Wednesday morning.

“On behalf of the Lomu family, I can confirm that Jonah Lomu died this morning, most probably about 8 or 9” Mayhew said. “The family are obviously devastated, as are friends and acquaintances.

“The family have requested privacy at this stage, they are obviously going through a terrible time. It was totally unexpected. Jonah and his family arrived back from the United Kingdom last night and he suddenly died this morning.”
All Blacks legend Jonah Lomu dies aged 40
Lomu had suffered from health problems since his retirement from playing in 2002 due to a rare kidney disease, nephrotic syndrome. He underwent a kidney transplant in 2004 and had been on dialysis treatment for the past 10 years.All

He had recently travelled to the UK for the Rugby World Cup, during which he worked with tournament sponsors. He and his family holidayed in Dubai on their way back to New Zealand.


“We’re all shocked and deeply saddened at the sudden death of Jonah Lomu,” New Zealand Rugby chief executive Steve Tew said.

“Jonah was a legend of our game and loved by his many fans both here and around the world. We’re lost for words and our heartfelt sympathies go out to Jonah’s family.”

He played in 63 Tests for New Zealand after making his debut in 1994. He scored 37 tries and his physical, often brutal, running game regularly terrorised defences the world over.

The bullocking try he scored against England at the 1995 World Cup, when opposition defenders bounced off him on his way to the line, was this year voted the greatest in World Cup history.

Blacks legend Jonah Lomu
Lomu rose to international prominence during that tournament in South Africa, helping take the game to a global audience it had not previously reached.

“What it meant for rugby, that World Cup changed everything,” Lomu told the Guardian in August. “When I look at it now I understand my impact more. When they show clips of me on the TV, my sons turn and look at me. They have grown up as the sons of Jonah and it’s a daunting task trying to explain to them what I achieved.” The Guardian
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